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Hitting the Spot


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Joel Park

Hitting the Spot

Purpose/Goal: 

Learn to navigate with precision through complicated target/positioning sequences. 

 

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Setup notes:

This drill requires you to construct a narrow opening in between two vision barriers. Set the vision barriers close together to create an opening. When engaging the required targets from that shooting position, your shots all must pass through the opening. This is denoted as position two in the diagram.

You should use a fault line to force yourself to stay back from the opening in the vision barriers. When properly constructed you will not be able to see all the targets in position two without shifting yourself around using your legs.

You will also need one conventional shooting position. There only needs to be one target associated with this position. This is denoted as position one in the diagram. 

Instructions:

Start in position one. Shoot the appropriate targets from that spot. Move to position two and engage the appropriate targets. When you are finished in position two move back to position one and engage the appropriate target or targets from that location.

Cues:

When it comes to moving through this drill, the most important thing you can do is to get your stance out nice and wide. If you set the drill up properly, you will need to make a few small position changes when working through position two of the drill. If you are standing tall with your feet close together, the difficulty of this will be magnified. Get low, get wide and be ready to move.

When it comes to shooting, the best practice is to react to what you are seeing. You will be off balance or unstable as you work thorough position two. If your sights look good, start shooting. It is common on this drill for people to be far too conservative as it relates to what the sights need to look like.

Assess position two very carefully. If there is a viable way to “blend” together the targets where you can in any way maintain motion through the position, try to do it. The little tricks like this are the time savers at matches that make the difference in major championship matches.

Corrections:

If you find yourself excessively off balance or unstable, the likely cause is that you are making yourself lean a little bit to see a target as opposed to moving the extra half step so you can stand comfortably and engage it. This problem is common and I strongly recommend you move an extra little bit to make the shooting easier.

Evolution:

The main variable you can focus on to change things up is the opening in position two. By altering the width of the opening and the distance of that opening from the fault line you can make life for yourself extremely easy or very difficult. As you improve, do not be shy about making this drill very tough.

You should also alter your path through position two. You can work the position left to right or right to left and that will usually make things change quite a bit.

Try stipulating a “goofy” order of target engagement. Goofy orders are orders that make no sense for a match. For example, shooting the center target in position two then the left and then finally the right target would add challenge. This makes for good training even if you would not do it in a match.

Tips:

The most important thing you need to bear in mind for this drill is, it requires you to have a plan. You need to take the drill seriously. Walk it through just like you would in a match. Find “markers” (spots on the vision barrier or the group) that help you find your exact shooting position. You must have a specific strategy to locate the correct shooting locations when you move to position two. Do not neglect this step.

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