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Measurement Drill


Joel Park
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Joel Park

Measurement Drill

Purpose/Goal:

Build an understanding of how much energy it requires to return your pistol to point of aim after firing a shot.

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Setup notes:

This drill requires only one target. 5 yards is a good distance to use.

Instructions:

Grip your pistol properly. Engage the very center of the A zone of your target with one carefully fired shot. DO NOT PUSH THE GUN BACK DOWN AFTER FIRING THE SHOT. Fire a second shot at the point the gun recoiled to without re-aiming to your aimpoint. The distance between the two shots is the information you are looking for. This will measure how much the muzzle rises, and thus how much it should be returned. Repeat this until you have a good sense of the amount the muzzle rises.

After you understand the amount of muzzle rise, start returning the muzzle back down to the original point of aim between the first and second shots. Start going slowly (1 or 2 seconds between shots). As you continue to train and understand, increase your speed until you are shooting as fast as you can pull the trigger.

Cues:

This drill does not have any objective to build or correct technique. Your only job is to learn how much energy it requires to return your pistol to point of aim after firing a shot.

Corrections:

This drill does not have any objective to build or correct technique. Your only job is to learn how much energy it requires to return your pistol to point of aim after firing a shot.

Evolution:

Feel free to attempt this drill in unusual circumstances. Consider trying leans, awkward positions, or one-handed shooting in order to build more understanding.

Tips:

The point of this drill is to measure how much the muzzle rises when you fire a shot. This might seem like a strange thing to do, but with a little more context it will make sense.

This drill was developed by Hwansik Kim to work on the concept of recoil control. Most people have an incorrect concept of recoil control. They believe that it will take a lot of muscle mass, force, and effort to control the recoil of their pistol. The point of this drill is to facilitate you demonstrating to yourself that none of this is true. You do not need to work all that hard in order to bring your pistol down out of recoil. The muzzle of your pistol should only marginally rise when you fire a shot. The main issue you will have as you learn to shoot faster and faster is battling your tendency to overcorrect or overcontrol that recoil. Once you internalize how little force is required to return the gun it should improve your concept of recoil control.

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