Procedure:

String 1 : Fire a shot at the center of the target (at the letter A) without pushing the gun down or bringing the sight back down after recoil, then after a slight pause (around 0.5 seconds or more), fire another shot wherever the sight lands after the first shot. Then measure how much the distance between the shots is and figure out how much you need to bring the sight back down from the second shot placement to the center of the target.

String 2 : Fire a shot at the center again and after confirming the gun is stopped after recoil and slowly bring the gun back down to the center as you measure how much you need to bring the gun back down. Then start the process of bringing the sight back down a little bit faster and fire the shot as soon as the sight is back on the center and increase the speed of pair shots as you shoot more.

Focus:

Learning exactly how much the sight has to come down to shoot perfect pairs.

Goal:

Maintaining the same distance of sight coming down (push down) regardless of how fast the splits are.

Commentary:

In this drill, there are a couple of important factors.

1. Keeping the grip, wrist and elbow locked as if you would shoot any other drills like doubles or bill drills.

2. When the recoil is happening, let the gun recoil. The process of bringing the sight back down happens after the slide cycles. The slide cycle time is about 0.06 seconds on most pistols. So the process of bringing the sight back down should happen after that.

Most pistols have a high bore axis. Mixing in physics, when we fire the gun, there will be an upward force created by the leverage related to the bore axis and the grip axis. If the operator doesn’t push the gun down, the gun will stop higher than the original spot after a shot.

The point of this drill is to measure and observe how high the gun goes up and how much you need to return the gun down (String 1). Then, develop the ability to bring it back down the same amount in a faster pace as you increase the split speed (String 2).